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Lincoln met with his cabinet on July 22, 1862 for the first reading of a draft of the Emancipation Proclamation.
Lincoln met with his cabinet on July 22, 1862 for the first reading of a draft of the Emancipation Proclamation.
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Emancipation Proclamation

American Document Emancipation Slaves in the Confederacy (1863)

After the Battle of Stones River in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Abraham Lincoln decided that it was time to unveil the Emancipation Proclamation, January 1st, 1863. The proclamation did not free any slaves of the border states (Kentucky, Missouri, Maryland, Delaware, and West Virginia), or any southern state (or part of a state) already under Union control. The Emancipation Proclamation was widely attacked at the time as freeing only the slaves over which the Union had no power. In practice, it committed the Union to ending slavery, which was a controversial decision in the North. Lincoln issued the Executive Order by his authority as "Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy."

Though this document in actuality did very little, it became a mission statement and redefinition of the Civil War. The proclamation paved the way for the 13th amendment which abolished and prohibited slavery.

Submitted By:  David Allison


 
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