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Gettysburg Address

Speech by Abraham Lincoln (1863)

In just over two minutes, Predident Lincoln invoked the principles of human equality espoused by the Declaration of Independence and redefined the Civil War as a struggle not merely for the Union, but as "a new birth of freedom" that would bring true equality to all of its citizens, and that would also create a unified nation in which states' rights were no longer dominant.

Beginning with the now-iconic phrase "Four score and seven years ago...", Lincoln referred to the events of the Civil War and described the ceremony at Gettysburg as an opportunity not only to dedicate the grounds of a cemetery, but also to consecrate the living in the struggle to ensure that "government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."

The Gettysburg Address exemplified the American resolve to hold the Union together as well as creating a system of National Cemeteries.



Photos
Abraham Lincoln
Delivering the Gettysburg Address
Click to enlarge.